How to Boost Sales with Multi-Channel Marketing

Marketing managers have a lot of options in for marketing tactics, which can make creating a cohesive marketing strategy difficult. Where should a company’s limited number of advertising dollars go? Should a marketing plan focus on web ads, email, mobile, social media, direct mail, print media, radio, TV, or pay-per-click? The answer is yes—all of them.


people in a circle

Is Your Marketing Strategy Based on the Golden Circle?

In the movie Amistad, Theodore Joadson is a defense lawyer representing illegally purchased slaves who are accused of mutiny and murder after causing an uprising on the ship that was bringing them from Africa to Cuba. Public opinion was against the kidnapped slaves, so Joadson asks an elderly John Quincy Adams for help. Adams asks Joadson, “What’s their story?” Joadson starts telling Adams that the group of men is from West Africa, when Adams interrupts, saying, “No … what is their story? You know what they are, but what you don’t know—and from what I can tell, haven’t bothered in the least to discover—is who they are.”


What’s Your SEO Strategy?

You hear about Search Engine Optimization (SEO) all the time. You know it’s important, but do you know how it affects your business? SEO increases the traffic that’s directed to your website through search engine results. There are steps a company can take to make those search engine results more favorable, but that requires a strategy. Does your company have an SEO strategy?


What Can You Learn from Your Website?

Your company has an attractive and fully functioning website. Your products are easy to find, easy to see, easy for customers to purchase, and that’s great. But if that’s all your website does, you’re only using a fraction of its potential.


Building a Better Website

Twenty years ago, the internet was only five years old, and was still a bit of a curiosity. In 1998, there was no Facebook and Google was a startup. Amazon had a web presence, but they just sold books. Back in the days when AOL ruled, if your company had a website, you were on the cutting edge. In the early years of the internet, websites were more of a vanity item than a marketing tool.